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Abolitionist Network
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Creating a network of
modern-day abolitionists and
using a living systems approach
to address human trafficking
Abolitionist network

 

The Abolitionist Network equips Christian leaders to understand and abolish systems of human trafficking.

 


What we do

The Abolitionist Network is a community of leaders in the Church seeking to understand the systems driving human trafficking in Boston and beyond, and pursuing effective Church engagement. We are asking: "What does it look like for our local congregations to be the hands and feet of Jesus in our neighborhoods; preventing, identifying and ultimately ending abuse and exploitation?"

 

We support these "Abolitionist" leaders through: 

Connecting: We host monthly lunch gatherings, and quarterly prayer and worship gatherings, to build relationships, share ideas, and pray for each other. We also have a cohort of church and ministry leaders who are committed to walk alongside one another as they lead their teams in engaging the movement against human trafficking. We believe every part of the diverse body of Christ has a valuable role to play -- across traditions, denominations, languages and cultures -- and we seek to connect with leaders from every background.

Are you an Abolitionist Church Leader?

  • Come to a lunch gathering
  • Come to a Worship and prayer night 
  • Join the Abolitionist Network leadership cohort
  • for more info email: sdurfey@egc.org 

EquippingWe stay in tune with the local counter-trafficking landscape, host trainings, and share resources to help churches understand the root causes driving the systems of exploitation, recognize their own part in the problem, and then identify where they can take action through prevention and aftercare efforts, community awareness and intentional prayer.

  • Quarterly trainings: "How does our Church holistically engage the systems of exploitation?"
  • Localized trainings: Invite us to do a training at your Church, Sunday school, community group
  • Join the Greater Boston Prayer and Action Newsletter for updates! 
  • Translate resources into your language, Help lead trainings in your community 
  • Exploitation Response Plan impementation trainings for your church or ministry

Refreshment and self care: To fight burnout, we emphasize the importance of rest in our trainings, encourage busy abolitionists in the network to practice regular Sabbath rest, and we host bi- annual retreats.

  • Come to a retreat: email sdurfey@egc.org 
  • check out our Resources for rhythms of Sabbath rest

Check out this video! 

What does Human Trafficking look like in Boston? 

Human Trafficking is a form of slavery with both global and local impact, making billions of dollars annually through the buying and selling of men women and children to abuse their lives and bodies in various forms of labor and sexual exploitation. Boston is a hub for human trafficking in New England and an entry point for people brought into North America from around the world. Children born and raised in Boston are tricked into sex trafficking rings through relationships with false “boyfriends” or “modeling agencies”, adult refugees newly resettled in Chelsea are recruited into debt bondage by an employer taking advantage of their desperation for work, and House cleaners or nannies in Brighton are trapped and abused and threatened with deportation if they try to get help.

These are just a few examples of what Human Trafficking looks like locally, and through years of learning, and mapping out the systems of vulnerability recruitment and intervention the Abolitionist Network believes the Church in the Boston area has a crucial role to play in breaking these systems of exploitation.

The Systems of Human Trafficking/Slavery - mapped out

 


Resources

  • Route One Ministry is a partner ministry of the Abolitionist Network, directed by Bonnie Gatchell 
  • Bags of Hope  is a partner ministry of the Abolitionist Network, directed by Jasmine Marino